Wednesday, March 7, 2012

Topping a table with zinc sheet metal

 So here's the whole set finished up....I did a post on painting with the ASCP in "Emperor's Silk" a couple of days ago...this post is a long one but if you're curious as to how we topped the table with zinc this will show you the process....
 First is measuring of course.  And the zinc comes in sheets which have a plastic protective sheet on one side (you'll see it in some of the other photos)
 This is the adhesive that attaches the sheet metal to the surface...it helps eliminate any "bounce" between the table top and the metal...
 The clamps are there to hold the metal down nice and tight and then my husband had some boxes on it to weight it down in the center as well.  The piece of narrow wood on top of the table is just added protection against marring the surface of the metal from the clamps...
 The corners are trimmed and on this one it was a little tricky since they were rounded....he trimmed more out later as you'll see further down....
 Now he's using a "slapper" hammer which is wood covered in a heavy piece of leather...(I think he made this slapper)  you can buy these hammers any place that sells metal shaping supplies.
 Here you can see how he trimmed more out of the corners so they would lay nice and smooth...all of this will get soldered so it covers all those gaps...
At this point he tacks it into the bottom of the table with some small nails.  So it wraps all the way around the table top...
 He keeps gently tapping with the hammer to get the zinc to lay as close to the surface of the table as possible...
 So now for the soldering...we purchased the flux and zinc solder from the same place we bought our zinc.
 The soldering iron (above) is what you use to heat the solder to melt into the gaps and cracks.
 The flux is sort of like primer for paint...it helps the solder stick to the metal so you want to make sure to get down into the cracks and surfaces that you want to get soldered together...
 Lay the solder on top of the gap and melt it into the cracks with the iron...it will get filed and sanded so at first it looks really messy
 Here's the first corner ready to be filed...
 This is the filing....
 Here it is filed down and ready to sand...
 If you see holes in the solder or gaps you can add more solder and file again...you want it to be solid and completely filled in....
 It then gets sanded with 100 grit sandpaper...
 A view from underneath...
 Time to pull off the protective plastic and give it some patina...
I have some photos of the patina process (to see that my post on the patina process click HERE)we did on another piece my husband made...so another post...
I think this one is long enough--
And I am the proud new owner of 4 quarts of ASCP, (French linen, Old white, Paris grey, and Arles), some clear and dark wax AND the book with all these wonderful uses for the paint....
I can't wait to play!!!
I am submitting this to the party below...first time I've done this party...
DIY Club
And we made the top 10!!!!  Thanks DIY club!!!
Here is a link to all 10 winners...

60 comments:

  1. I love the table! Happy birthday;)

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  2. Wow! Great tutorial! Love it!

    http://www.remodelandolacasa.com

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  3. Rachel! You are reading my mind! I did a class recently where I learned to age zinc. I bought the chemicals, then figured out how to cut large sheets of zinc on my table saw. I read several versions of how to get wrap a table in it, but none of them were very good. This is the most awesome tutorial, I have been wanting to try this. I am going to order the supplies online. Where did you get the large sheet of zinc? I am not sure where to begin. Thanks! -K

    PS Pinning this and featuring that awesome table next week!

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  4. WOW! It's gorgeous. I've never seen this done - so fascinating! Great tutorial! Karen (Redoux) sent me over. I'm so glad! ;)

    Have a great week!
    Roeshel

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    1. Thanks Roeshel! I have submitted it to your party--(hope I did everything I was supposed to) very kind words about our work. We enjoy doing things together and this project was no different. I even learned to solder on this one! I appreciate Karen sending you over...thanks for checking it out...

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  5. I have no idea how to solder - that is awesome and your tutorial is FAB!

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    1. Thanks Holly! I'm having fun learning! And thanks for the compliment on the tutorial...

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  6. Oh My goodness! Your table is beautiful and the zinc top was the crowning jewel! Wow! I always wondered how to do those corners and your instructions were amazing!
    Thanks for the tutorial!
    Susan
    Homeroad

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  7. I love this table. I have a portable kitchen piece that needs a new top. Now I have the ammo to do it like this! Great job. Congrats on the top 10 - hope you win!

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  8. oh-and did you have to go to a metal specialty place to by the zinc or was it available at lowes or home depot?

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    1. We order online. Not something that's available "off the shelf"....

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    2. About how much did the sheet cost you? Do you have a link to where you purchased it? I love this idea!

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    3. We ordered from Roto metals online. The sheets come in various sizes and thicknesses so that determines the price.

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    4. What thickness did you use for the table?

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  9. I featured this today! it's fantastic! http://www.kimboscrafts.blogspot.com/2012/04/shout-outs.html

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  10. Your table is awesome! Where did you buy the zinc online? What site?

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  11. Hello! Love this post! What did you use to patina the zinc?

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  12. Hello! Love this post! What did you use to patina the zinc?

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    1. Robyn I just did a post the other day on the patina process....it's here...http://vanhookandco.blogspot.com/2012/08/aging-zinc.html if you want to take a look. I need to add that to this post! Thanks for asking!!!!

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  13. Wonderful -- I've had a piece of zinc on my deck waiting to top a bench but I've been intimidated. You made this look so easy. A great fall project. Thanks!
    pam h
    howtorunyourlife.blogspot.com

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    1. Thanks Pamela! Good luck with your bench!!!

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  14. Wow, this looks amazing. I just broke out our soldering iron (after about 20 years of being in storage) and used it to make farmhouse looking pendant lights. I had so much fun that I'm looking for more projects to solder. Approximately how much did the zinc sheet cost?

    Great project, thanks for sharing!!!

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    1. Thanks Brittany. I enjoy soldering too it's a fun way to work with metal! I think we paid $178 (that's not including shipping or solder) and it's a 4' by 10' piece. It comes in different gauges (thickness) also so the price goes up or down depending on what you're using it for. Thanks for stopping by!

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  15. you guys did an amazing job!!!!! Just beautiful! Thank you for sharing!

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  16. My husband and I fell in love with a zinc table the other day (but the $2800 price tag was a little out of our budget) Came home, looked online, and found your blog. LOVE it! Now we are motivated to upcycle our current table into something we love. What gauge zinc sheet did you use for the table?

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    1. Beth we used .030 (20 gauge). We just thought anything less wouldn't be substantial enough. The thinner you go the cheaper it is but with it being a table you want it to hold up well. It's definitely much more cost effective to cover what you have!!! Ask away if you have any other questions!

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  17. Your table is gorgeous and your tutorial is fabulous. Thank you so much for sharing!

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  18. Oh sorry - I forgot to ask- what gauge did you use? Thanks!

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    1. Thanks so much! We used .030 (20 gauge) for this project and all the others in various posts on the blog.

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  20. Sheet Metal is a material that has been sought after and used for thousands of years for durable, lasting tools and equipment. Thanks for sharing this post with us.

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  21. Amazing how simple it can be to communicate with people and have them understand a certain topic, you made my day.

    Sheet metal

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for the kind words! We enjoyed doing it and then being able to share how we did it with others....a fun project for sure.

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  22. Small bits of content which are explained in details, helps me understand the topic, thank you!

    metal suppliers

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  23. I love your zinc table! I'm wanting a sort of industrial look to my new countertops, and am trying to decide between using zinc or stainless steel for them. I'd plan to order a thicker gauge zinc to cover new kitchen countertops if I go that direction, but am worried that eventually the countertops might look TOO dented and sort of "country"-looking after awhile. Do you have a photo you could post of your tabletop as it looks today? That might help me make my decision. Thanks!

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    1. I think I read that they made this particular table for a client. But I am also very interested in your thoughts on the sustainability of the metal top. Does it get easily dented, buckle or warp? We are starting our table in the next few weeks, I am so excited.

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    2. We did do this table for a client. So unfortunately I don't have any photos of how it looks now. If you are planning on doing it yourself though, steel is much harder--- harder to bend not as flexible to work with. We did countertops at a store for a friend with galvanized and aged it and it still looks really great. But my husband has access to a "break" which will bend the metal for you. You wouldn't be able to hammer it yourself around the edges and corners. As far as the zinc goes it is food safe. And you can always use scotch brite to smooth out the surface at any time you want. (That will also take off whatever patina has developed.) And it will look shiny and new again. Not sure if any of this helps or not and I'm usually more prompt at replying to blog comments...I must've missed this one somehow!

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  24. Great-looking table, great tutorial and I'm a new follower!
    Saw this on Pinterest. :)
    -Revi

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  25. Hi - do you remember the thickness of the steel sheet?

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    1. It was .030 (20 thousands) on this table

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  27. What a fabulous project & a wonderful tutorial. Thanks for showing me something new!

    Warmly,
    Michelle
    Faith, Trust & Pixie Dust

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  28. wow superb work. i must really appreciate your work. feeling great to see such kind of stuff.
    Leather beds in London

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  29. Nice work.

    I'm wondering if the solder is able to tarnish just as the zinc sheet? Or does that tend to always remain shiny?
    Amazing how well it blends in on the corner.
    Ben

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    1. Ben the solder tarnishes and darkens along with the zinc. It is amazing how well it can be blended to give that smooth transition on the corners. Thanks for stopping by!

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  31. Custom wheels are one of the most popular performance enhancing options on the market today.

    Rwm casters & Superior tire

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  32. I've been wanting to cover the top of my old desk with metal for years. I always thought I'd use aluminum or tin though. Any drawbacks or advantages to either of them?

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    1. Hello, Aluminum and tin would be easier to find locally than zinc. Roto metals is the only place I have been able to find the zinc sheet metal. The zinc is extremely maleable and easy to work and bend with hand tools. Aluminum is easy to work by hand if you have the right alloy some are very hard. Also aluminum will not patina like the zinc. Tin, steel, galvanized metal will have to be very thin to be able to work it by hand easily. Hope this helps and have fun with your project!!!

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    2. Aluminum and tin scratch very easily and it's not easy to buff out the scratches.

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  33. Just FYI, liquid nails does a very poor job of binding zinc when applied as described in this article. I used Gorilla Glue (or elmers glue MAX), or any glue that foams up. It works a LOT better. I really appreciated this tutorial, but I just wanted to relay that Liquid Nails does not stick to zinc sheets well at all.

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  34. Your dazzling work has won my heart. I’ll come soon to your site with new hope. claim compensation

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  35. Your table is gorgeous and your tutorial is fabulous.
    Plywood Company in India

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  36. The zinc metal top looks great. I'm glad to see so many creative ideas involving metal integrated into every day items. It looks great, i'll probably make one of these more my bar. Thanks

    Ansel Marvin | J&E Metal

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  37. thanks for this attractive table, the table cover is made with Sheet Metal Forming process.

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